skip to primary navigationskip to content
 

Leica DM1000 phase-contrast

Leica DM1000-wifi

The Leica DM1000-wifi is a portable microscope offering standard brightfield or phase-contrast illumination with Kohler illumination that is simple to set up. Within the camera body is a 5MP colour wifi camera that streams images to your phone or tablet using the freely available Leica AirLab app. The app enables a variety of controls such as exposure, white balance, scale and other annotations. Battery packs enable the microscope to be used without an external power source.

  

 

Features:

  • Phase-contrast optics
  • Leica ICC50 W camera with wifi (requires free iOS/Android app), hdmi and usb outputs
  • SD card port
  • Stain-free, easy-clean stage.

 

Objectives:

4x, 10x, 20x, 40x, 100x oil immersion.

 

RSS Feed Latest news

SLCU gets ready for the Festival of Plants

May 16, 2017

Can we improve crop photosynthesis to feed the world sustainably? A lecture by Prof Steve Long as well as tours, talks and activities mark SLCU's involvement in the upcoming Festival of Plants on 20 May.

How to become a giant cell? Fluctuations in a key regulator guide cell size in flower organs.

Mar 06, 2017

A key regulator has been discovered to determine cell size in flowers through random fluctuations. Counterintuitively, this randomness can lead to patterns. This finding helps us to understand how biological patterns are initiated, how shape and size are determined during growth, and may lead to important discoveries improving crop yields.

Ottoline Leyser honoured with the 2017 FEBS | EMBO Women in Science Award

Jan 09, 2017

EMBO and FEBS announce SLCU Director Professor Ottoline Leyser as the recipient of the tenth FEBS | EMBO Women in Science Award.

Plant ‘thermometer’ discovered that triggers springtime budding by measuring night-time heat

Oct 27, 2016

A photoreceptor molecule in plant cells has been found to moonlight as a thermometer after dark – allowing plants to read seasonal temperature changes. Scientists say the discovery could help breed crops that are more resilient to the temperatures expected to result from climate change.

View all news

SLCU Logo