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Leica-Renishaw SP8-FLIMan

A partnership between SLCU and three companies; Leica Microsystems, Leica Industrial and Renishaw, the FLIMan allows a diverse range of specialist techniques in addition to high-end confocal microscopy:

- Real time imaging of protein-protein interactions and biosensors using FLIM.

- Label-free organelle imaging using Raman, in addition to fluorescently labelled reporters.

- Direct imaging of molecular constituents of cells and tissues with applications to phytohormones.

Equipment

Leica SP8 confocal with dual channel FLIM, 2x HyD SMD detectors, 2x PMTs, 1x t-PMT, automatic stage for use in both confocal and Raman modes. Renishaw InVia Raman system with Rencam CCD and Andor EMCCD detectors. Conversion kit for liquid samples.

Software

Leica LAS X with FLIM module, Picoquant software for photon counting. WiRE software for Raman spectral acquisition and
mapping.
 

Lasers:

(Confocal) Pulsed 405nm, 440nm, 470nm. Continuous 440nm, 488nm, 514nm and 552nm
(Raman) 532nm, 785nm.

Objectives:

(SP8+Raman) 20x dry, 20x 0.75NA multi-immersion, 25x 0.95NA water dipping, 63x 1.2NA water, 63x 1.4NA oil.
(Raman only) 5x dry, 20x dry, 50x dry, 20x 0.75NA multi-immersion.

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Ottoline Leyser honoured with the 2017 FEBS | EMBO Women in Science Award

Jan 09, 2017

EMBO and FEBS announce SLCU Director Professor Ottoline Leyser as the recipient of the tenth FEBS | EMBO Women in Science Award.

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