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Welcome to Plone

Congratulations! You have successfully installed Plone.

If you're seeing this instead of the web site you were expecting, the owner of this web site has just installed Plone. Do not contact the Plone Team or the Plone mailing lists about this.

Get started

Before you start exploring your newly created Plone site, please do the following:

  1. Make sure you are logged in as an admin/manager user. (You should have a Site Setup entry in the menu in the top right corner)
  2. Set up your mail server. (Plone needs a valid SMTP server to verify users and send out password reminders)
  3. Decide what security level you want on your site. (Allow self registration, password policies, etc)

Get comfortable

After that, we suggest you do one or more of the following:

Make it your own

Plone has a lot of different settings that can be used to make it do what you want it to. Some examples:

Tell us how you use it

Are you doing something interesting with Plone? Big site deployments, interesting use cases? Do you have a company that delivers Plone-based solutions?

Find out more about our architecture

Plone is based on the Zope application server, and uses the Python programming language. More about these technologies:

Donate to the Plone Foundation

Plone is made possible only through the efforts of thousands of dedicated individuals and hundreds of companies. The Plone Foundation:

  • …protects and promotes Plone.
  • …is a registered 501(c)(3) charitable organization.
  • …donations are tax-deductible.
  • Show your support!

Thanks for using our product, we hope you like it!

—The Plone Team

RSS Feed Latest news

SLCU gets ready for the Festival of Plants

May 16, 2017

Can we improve crop photosynthesis to feed the world sustainably? A lecture by Prof Steve Long as well as tours, talks and activities mark SLCU's involvement in the upcoming Festival of Plants on 20 May.

How to become a giant cell? Fluctuations in a key regulator guide cell size in flower organs.

Mar 06, 2017

A key regulator has been discovered to determine cell size in flowers through random fluctuations. Counterintuitively, this randomness can lead to patterns. This finding helps us to understand how biological patterns are initiated, how shape and size are determined during growth, and may lead to important discoveries improving crop yields.

Ottoline Leyser honoured with the 2017 FEBS | EMBO Women in Science Award

Jan 09, 2017

EMBO and FEBS announce SLCU Director Professor Ottoline Leyser as the recipient of the tenth FEBS | EMBO Women in Science Award.

Plant ‘thermometer’ discovered that triggers springtime budding by measuring night-time heat

Oct 27, 2016

A photoreceptor molecule in plant cells has been found to moonlight as a thermometer after dark – allowing plants to read seasonal temperature changes. Scientists say the discovery could help breed crops that are more resilient to the temperatures expected to result from climate change.

View all news

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