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March 17 Science Festival Talk: Illuminating Life at the Single Cell Level

last modified Feb 05, 2015 01:04 PM
Ticketing is now open for Dr James Locke’s talk for the Cambridge Science Festival

Recent advances in microscopy are revealing a rich level of variability in individual cell behaviour, even in genetically identical cells in identical environments. This variability or noise has been observed in everything from bacteria to stem cells, and affects how populations of cells behave collectively. Dr James Locke will explore this new research, which has the potential to affect our understanding of antibiotic resistance, cancer and plant development.

SLCU will also be participating in Science on Saturday on 14 March. Come and see us in the Plant Sciences marquee in the Downing Site.

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