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Axioimager

Zeiss Axioimager microscope with Vivatome

Vivatome_2.jpg

The Zeiss Axioimager.M2 offers several features: High quality Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) imaging, standard epifluorescence and sensitive Vivatome epifluorescence.

It is fitted with 3 cameras: 64 MP colour, standard colour and sensitive Hamamatsu 1k x 1k EMCCD. The EMCCD, when used in conjunction with the Zeiss fast acquisition module, is capable of speeds in excess of 50 frames per second with exposure times as low as milliseconds for weak signals and microseconds for strong signals.

An optional Vivatome module is available, consisting of a grated disk and the separation of the signal in to two light paths that give two images on the camera containing either (i) in-focus data or (ii) disk-reflected out-of-focus signal. More information can be found  here. All multidimensional modes (channel, time, z-stack) are supported. 

 

Software:

Axiovision incorporating modules Inside4D, High Dynamic Range, Fast Acquisition and Physiology.

 

Axioimager filters:

DAPI, FITC/GFP, DsRED, YFP, CFP, FRET

 

Vivatome filters:

DAPI, FITC/GFP, DsRED

 

Objectives:

PlanApochromat 10x /0.3

PlanApochromat 20x/ 0.8

EC Plan-NeuFluar 40x/ 0.75

PlanApochromat 63x/ 1.4 (oil immersion)

EC Plan-NeuFluar 100x/ 1.3 (oil immersion)

 

A 60x/1.2 water immersion objective can be fitted upon request.

axioimager

 

 

 

Supported by the Gatsby Charitable Foundation

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