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Correlation between cell size and cell nuclei size in plant stem cells

The Jönsson group previously showed a correlation between cell size and cell nuclei size in plant stem cells - Top left: shoot stem cells where the membranes are marked in red and nuclei are marked in green. Top right: plot showing the size relation between cells and cell nuclei in the stem cell region [modified from Willis et al PNAS (2016)]. In this project an interdisciplinary approach will be used to investigate the connection between cell shapes, nuclear deformations and genetic activity – Bottom right: a cell removed from the tissue can be used for biophysical perturbations, microtubules are marked in green and the nuclei in purple (Formosa-Jordan, Wang, Jönsson, unpublished). Bottom right: mechanical stress patterns predicted during the initial outgrowth of a root hair from a finite element model simulation [from Krupinski et al Front Plant Sci (2016)]. A challenge of the project will be to integrate this type of model to include an effect on cell nuclei.
Correlation between cell size and cell nuclei size in plant stem cells
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