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Stirling Prize 2012

bldg03The Sainsbury Laboratory is delighted to have been chosen as the winner of the Stirling Prize for 2012. The Stirling Prize is the UK's most prestigious architecture prize and is awarded to the project built or designed in Britain "which has made the greatest contribution to the evolution of architecture in the past year."

The building was described as a "timeless piece of architecture" and an "exceptional building." Judges highlighted the Laboratory's blending of private and public space, the flexibility of design that allows for evolving and changing scientific needs and its integration within the sensitive site of the University Botanic Garden. Lord Sainsbury said:

“I am delighted that Stanton Williams has won the RIBA Stirling Prize for the Sainsbury Laboratory, in competition with some outstanding buildings. I am also very proud to be associated with their inspiring building which sets a new standard for laboratory design and blends in beautifully with the historic Botanic Gardens.”

For media enquiries, please contact:

Tim Holt, Head of Communications, Office of External Affairs and Communications, University of Cambridge, tim.holt@admin.cam.ac.uk, Tel: 44 (0)1223 (7)65954

 

 

Supported by the Gatsby Foundation

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