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New insights could help plants fortify walls against root pathogens

Sainsbury Laboratory Cambridge University (SLCU) researchers, as part of a multidisciplinary international team, have uncovered a mechanism controlling subtle changes to the architecture of cell walls in plant roots that bolsters their defence against Phytophthora palmivora without negatively affecting plant growth.

New insights could help plants fortify walls against root pathogens - Read More…

Giles Oldroyd elected as member of EMBO

Professor Giles Oldroyd is among 63 other scientists from around the world elected this year as Members and Associate Members of the European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO).

Giles Oldroyd elected as member of EMBO - Read More…

Cells in tight spaces – how the cytoskeleton responds to different cell geometries

Inside every living cell, there is a network of protein filaments providing an interior scaffold controlling the cell’s shape called the cytoskeleton. Research from the Sainsbury Laboratory Cambridge University (SLCU) suggests that this relationship might actually be two-way, with cell geometry itself having the capacity to influence the organisation of the cytoskeleton in living plant cells.

Cells in tight spaces – how the cytoskeleton responds to different cell geometries - Read More…

Professor Dame Ottoline Leyser appointed as new CEO of UKRI

Professor Dame Ottoline Leyser DBE FRS, Director of the Sainsbury Laboratory at the University of Cambridge, has been appointed the new Chief Executive Officer of UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), the national funding agency investing in science and research in the UK.

Professor Dame Ottoline Leyser appointed as new CEO of UKRI - Read More…

Giles Oldroyd elected as a fellow of the Royal Society

Professor Giles Oldroyd has been recognised for his outstanding contributions to science in plant-microbe interactions with his election as a fellow of the Royal Society.

Giles Oldroyd elected as a fellow of the Royal Society - Read More…

2020 Waddington Medal

SLCU Director Professor Ottoline Leyser has been awarded the 2020 Waddington Medal by the British Society for Developmental Biology (BSDB).

2020 Waddington Medal - Read More…

Discovery of expanding pectin nanofilaments that manipulate plant cell shapes

Scientists have discovered new filamentous structures within plant cell walls that influence cell growth and help build complex three-dimensional cell shapes.

Discovery of expanding pectin nanofilaments that manipulate plant cell shapes - Read More…

Random gene pulsing generates patterns during development of living systems

A team of Cambridge scientists working at the intersection between biology and computation has found that random gene activity helps patterns form during development of a model multicellular system.

Random gene pulsing generates patterns during development of living systems - Read More…

People of Science

Professor Ottoline Leyser talks to Professor Brian Cox about her admiration for Nobel Prize winning geneticist, Barbara McClintock and explains the two great principles she uncovered.

People of Science - Read More…

Overlap in lateral root and nodule development brings self-fertilising cereals one step closer

A vision of creating crops that do not need chemical fertilisers is one step closer thanks to the recent discovery that a substantial overlap exists in the developmental programmes plants use for lateral roots and nitrogen-fixing nodules.

Overlap in lateral root and nodule development brings self-fertilising cereals one step closer - Read More…

Hinchingbrooke School solves botanical crime scene

We were delighted to welcome Sixth Form students from Hinchingbrooke School to SLCU this week to meet our scientists and solve a botanic-inspired crime.

Hinchingbrooke School solves botanical crime scene - Read More…

Mix of LCOs and COs essential for mycorrhizal establishment

An international collaboration of scientists working to optimise arbuscular mycorrhizal associations to improve sustainability in agriculture has demonstrated new insights into how signalling pathways promote symbiotic microbial associations with plants.

Mix of LCOs and COs essential for mycorrhizal establishment - Read More…

Revealing the nanostructure of wood could help raise height limits for wooden skyscrapers

Cambridge researchers have captured the visible nanostructure of wood in its live hydrated state for the first time using an advanced low-temperature scanning electron microscope.

Revealing the nanostructure of wood could help raise height limits for wooden skyscrapers - Read More…

Network and genetic analyses reveal 32 cambium transcription factors

A comprehensive analysis of the transcription factors (TF) that play in the vascular cambium has boosted our understanding of the underlying transcriptional regulation in this important plant meristem through the discovery of 32 cambium TFs.

Network and genetic analyses reveal 32 cambium transcription factors - Read More…

Big Biology Day 2019

Seeds, Bees and Pollen was the theme at this year's hands-on exhibition run jointly by the Sainsbury Laboratory Cambridge University (SLCU) and Cambridge University Botanic Garden (CUBG) at Big Biology Day.

Big Biology Day 2019 - Read More…

Drought stress triggers Rider retrotransposons

Once dismissed as ‘junk DNA’ that served no purpose, a family of ‘jumping genes’ found in tomatoes has the potential to accelerate crop breeding for traits such as improved drought resistance.

Drought stress triggers Rider retrotransposons - Read More…

Food of the Future: free online course launched to inspire the next generation of scientists

A new, free online course aimed at 16-19 year olds across Europe, funded by EIT Food and developed by the Gatsby Plant Science Education Programme (GPSEP) at the University of Cambridge alongside international partners, aims to inspire young people to study science so they can help to create food of the future.

Food of the Future: free online course launched to inspire the next generation of scientists - Read More…

How plants coordinate their biological clocks

New research from James Locke's group shows that clocks in plant seedlings can self-organise without a master.

How plants coordinate their biological clocks - Read More…

Engineering new rhizosphere signalling networks to produce crops that need less fertiliser

An interdisciplinary research collaboration between SLCU and the University of Oxford has engineered a novel synthetic plant-microbe signalling pathway that could provide the foundation for transferring nitrogen fixation to cereals.

Engineering new rhizosphere signalling networks to produce crops that need less fertiliser - Read More…

Giles Oldroyd announced as Professor of Crop Science at 3CS

Giles Oldroyd announced as Professor of Crop Science at 3CS

The University of Cambridge has elected Giles Oldroyd to the Russel R Geiger Professorship of Crop Science, leading the Cambridge Centre for Crop Science (3CS), which is a partnership between the University of Cambridge and NIAB.

Giles Oldroyd announced as Professor of Crop Science at 3CS - Read More…

Ancestral deterrence strategy protects land plants from microbial infection

Scientists at Sainsbury Laboratory have uncovered striking similarities in how two distantly related plants defend against pathogens despite splitting from their common ancestor more than 400 million years ago.

Ancestral deterrence strategy protects land plants from microbial infection - Read More…

New research team joins SLCU

New research team joins SLCU

Dr Sarah Robinson has joined the SLCU research leadership team and will head a new research group focused on investigating the mechanical properties of plants associated with growth.

New research team joins SLCU - Read More…

SLCU researchers discover gene that could help us grow crops faster

Plant scientists at SLCU and the University of Bordeaux have discovered a gene that they hope can be used to widen a nutrient trafficking bottleneck and potentially increase crop yields.

SLCU researchers discover gene that could help us grow crops faster - Read More…

Enemy at the gates

The Schornack team has discovered that increasing the activity of a single gene can increase a plant’s resistance to blight at its first line of defence — the epidermis.

Enemy at the gates - Read More…

New insights into how bud-bud communication influences branching

New insights into how bud-bud communication influences branching

New insights into how buds communicate with each other through the dynamic auxin transport network have been published by SLCU plant scientists.

New insights into how bud-bud communication influences branching - Read More…

Plant Science Educator selected for Antarctic expedition

Alex Jenkin, project manager at the Gatsby Plant Science Education Programme (GPSEP), a team administered by the Sainsbury Laboratory, has been selected to join an international group of 95 women in science on a three-week expedition to the Antarctic Peninsula.

Plant Science Educator selected for Antarctic expedition - Read More…

SLCU welcomes new Research Group Leader

SLCU welcomes new Research Group Leader

SLCU is delighted to welcome Dr François Nédélec to the join its research leadership team.

SLCU welcomes new Research Group Leader - Read More…

Noisy gene atlas to help reveal how plants ‘hedge their bets’ in race for survival

As parents of identical twins will tell you, they are never actually identical, even though they have the same genes. This is also true in the plant world. Now, new research by Sainsbury Laboratory Cambridge University (SLCU) is helping to explain why ‘twin’ plants, with identical genes, grown in identical environments continue to display unique characteristics all of their own.

Noisy gene atlas to help reveal how plants ‘hedge their bets’ in race for survival - Read More…

How trees and turnips grow fatter – researchers unlock the secrets of radial growth

Plant science researchers from SLCU and the University of Helsinki have identified key regulatory networks controlling how plants grow ‘outwards’, which could help us to grow trees to be more efficient carbon sinks and increase vegetable crop yields.

How trees and turnips grow fatter – researchers unlock the secrets of radial growth - Read More…

Coronavirus

 

SLCU Reopening Site

(for staff & students)

 

University of Cambridge Guidance 

 

We would like to thank NHS staff, key workers and volunteers who are working tirelessly throughout the ongoing coronavirus pandemic in the UK. Our thoughts are with those whose health is impacted here in the UK and around the world.

 

 

Supported by the Gatsby Charitable Foundation

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New insights could help plants fortify walls against root pathogens

Sep 03, 2020

Sainsbury Laboratory Cambridge University (SLCU) researchers, as part of a multidisciplinary international team, have uncovered a mechanism controlling subtle changes to the architecture of cell walls in plant roots that bolsters their defence against Phytophthora palmivora without negatively affecting plant growth.

Giles Oldroyd elected as member of EMBO

Jul 10, 2020

Professor Giles Oldroyd is among 63 other scientists from around the world elected this year as Members and Associate Members of the European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO).

Cells in tight spaces – how the cytoskeleton responds to different cell geometries

Jul 09, 2020

Inside every living cell, there is a network of protein filaments providing an interior scaffold controlling the cell’s shape called the cytoskeleton. Research from the Sainsbury Laboratory Cambridge University (SLCU) suggests that this relationship might actually be two-way, with cell geometry itself having the capacity to influence the organisation of the cytoskeleton in living plant cells.

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