skip to primary navigationskip to content
 

News and events

Harnessing tomato jumping genes could help speed-breed drought-resistant crops

Once dismissed as ‘junk DNA’ that served no purpose, a family of ‘jumping genes’ found in tomatoes has the potential to accelerate crop breeding for traits such as improved drought resistance.

Harnessing tomato jumping genes could help speed-breed drought-resistant crops - Read More…

Food of the Future: free online course launched to inspire the next generation of scientists

A new, free online course aimed at 16-19 year olds across Europe, funded by EIT Food and developed by the Gatsby Plant Science Education Programme (GPSEP) at the University of Cambridge alongside international partners, aims to inspire young people to study science so they can help to create food of the future.

Food of the Future: free online course launched to inspire the next generation of scientists - Read More…

How plants coordinate their biological clocks

New research from James Locke's group shows that clocks in plant seedlings can self-organise without a master.

How plants coordinate their biological clocks - Read More…

Engineering new rhizosphere signalling networks to produce crops that need less fertiliser

An interdisciplinary research collaboration between SLCU and the University of Oxford has engineered a novel synthetic plant-microbe signalling pathway that could provide the foundation for transferring nitrogen fixation to cereals.

Engineering new rhizosphere signalling networks to produce crops that need less fertiliser - Read More…

Giles Oldroyd announced as Professor of Crop Science at 3CS

Giles Oldroyd announced as Professor of Crop Science at 3CS

The University of Cambridge has elected Giles Oldroyd to the Russel R Geiger Professorship of Crop Science, leading the Cambridge Centre for Crop Science (3CS), which is a partnership between the University of Cambridge and NIAB.

Giles Oldroyd announced as Professor of Crop Science at 3CS - Read More…

Ancestral deterrence strategy protects land plants from microbial infection

Scientists at Sainsbury Laboratory have uncovered striking similarities in how two distantly related plants defend against pathogens despite splitting from their common ancestor more than 400 million years ago.

Ancestral deterrence strategy protects land plants from microbial infection - Read More…

New research team joins SLCU

New research team joins SLCU

Dr Sarah Robinson has joined the SLCU research leadership team and will head a new research group focused on investigating the mechanical properties of plants associated with growth.

New research team joins SLCU - Read More…

SLCU researchers discover gene that could help us grow crops faster

Plant scientists at SLCU and the University of Bordeaux have discovered a gene that they hope can be used to widen a nutrient trafficking bottleneck and potentially increase crop yields.

SLCU researchers discover gene that could help us grow crops faster - Read More…

Enemy at the gates

The Schornack team has discovered that increasing the activity of a single gene can increase a plant’s resistance to blight at its first line of defence — the epidermis.

Enemy at the gates - Read More…

New insights into how bud-bud communication influences branching

New insights into how bud-bud communication influences branching

New insights into how buds communicate with each other through the dynamic auxin transport network have been published by SLCU plant scientists.

New insights into how bud-bud communication influences branching - Read More…

Plant Science Educator selected for Antarctic expedition

Alex Jenkin, project manager at the Gatsby Plant Science Education Programme (GPSEP), a team administered by the Sainsbury Laboratory, has been selected to join an international group of 95 women in science on a three-week expedition to the Antarctic Peninsula.

Plant Science Educator selected for Antarctic expedition - Read More…

SLCU welcomes new Research Group Leader

SLCU welcomes new Research Group Leader

SLCU is delighted to welcome Dr François Nédélec to the join its research leadership team.

SLCU welcomes new Research Group Leader - Read More…

Noisy gene atlas to help reveal how plants ‘hedge their bets’ in race for survival

As parents of identical twins will tell you, they are never actually identical, even though they have the same genes. This is also true in the plant world. Now, new research by Sainsbury Laboratory Cambridge University (SLCU) is helping to explain why ‘twin’ plants, with identical genes, grown in identical environments continue to display unique characteristics all of their own.

Noisy gene atlas to help reveal how plants ‘hedge their bets’ in race for survival - Read More…

How trees and turnips grow fatter – researchers unlock the secrets of radial growth

Plant science researchers from SLCU and the University of Helsinki have identified key regulatory networks controlling how plants grow ‘outwards’, which could help us to grow trees to be more efficient carbon sinks and increase vegetable crop yields.

How trees and turnips grow fatter – researchers unlock the secrets of radial growth - Read More…

SLCU helps reveal another layer in the strigolactone signalling pathway

An interdisciplinary collaboration between structural biologists and plant scientists has revealed another layer in the signalling pathway of strigolactone – a plant hormone that plays a key role in shoot branching and other plant development processes.

SLCU helps reveal another layer in the strigolactone signalling pathway - Read More…

Circadian clock imparts continuous control over the timing of cell division

SLCU researchers have demonstrated that the circadian clock is more complex than a simple ‘on-off switch’ when it comes to controlling cell division.

Circadian clock imparts continuous control over the timing of cell division - Read More…

SLCU recognised for commitment to gender equality

Sainsbury Laboratory Cambridge University (SLCU) has been recognised for its ongoing commitment to gender equality by achieving a Silver Award under the Athena SWAN Charter.

SLCU recognised for commitment to gender equality - Read More…

Current Biology Q&A with Giles Oldroyd

Current Biology Q&A with Giles Oldroyd

Current Biology recently interviewed Giles Oldroyd about his research and goals in science and life.

Current Biology Q&A with Giles Oldroyd - Read More…

SecretSanta: A new tool for deciphering the secret language of cell-to-cell communication

Plant biomathematicians at the Sainsbury Laboratory Cambridge University (SLCU) have developed a new tool that enables them to listen in on cell-to-environment conversations. The tool’s wide-ranging application means it could help speed-up the development of strategies to combat plant and animal pathogens.

SecretSanta: A new tool for deciphering the secret language of cell-to-cell communication - Read More…

Role of plants in farming future

SLCU's Director Ottoline Leyser & SLCU Group Leader Giles Oldroyd discuss opportunities plants will provide for the future of agriculture on BBC 4's Today programme.

Role of plants in farming future - Read More…

GM crop ruling shows why the EU's laws are wholly inadequate

SLCU Director Ottoline Leyser examines the European Court of Justice's recent ruling on genetically modified crops in her feature for The Conversation.

GM crop ruling shows why the EU's laws are wholly inadequate - Read More…

Behind the scenes with our researchers

Go behind the scenes with SLCU researcher Dr Annalisa Rizza to find out about her work.

Behind the scenes with our researchers - Read More…

SLCU Director presented OlChemIn Award 2018

SLCU Director presented OlChemIn Award 2018

SLCU Director, Professor Ottoline Leyser, was presented with the OlChemIn Award 2018 in recognition of her outstanding research on plant hormones.

SLCU Director presented OlChemIn Award 2018 - Read More…

Edwige Moyroud awarded Linnean Society Bicentenary Medal

Dr Edwige Moyroud has been honoured by the Linnean Society of London with the 2018 Bicentenary Medal for her discoveries on the evolution and development of nanoscale architecture in flower petals.

Edwige Moyroud awarded Linnean Society Bicentenary Medal - Read More…

Elliot Meyerowitz awarded prestigious Gruber Prize

Elliot Meyerowitz awarded prestigious Gruber Prize

Professor Elliot Meyerowitz has been awarded the 2018 Gruber Genetics Prize by the Gruber Foundation for his "groundbreaking work in identifying the basic regulatory and biochemical mechanisms underlying the development of plants."

Elliot Meyerowitz awarded prestigious Gruber Prize - Read More…

HFSP funding to investigate cellular growth and stresses in plants

HFSP funding to investigate cellular growth and stresses in plants

SLCU's Professor Henrik Jönsson is part of an international collaboration that has received funding from the Human Frontier Science Program (HFSP) to develop the first integrated model in plants investigating the effects from cellular growth and stresses on nuclear shape and genetic activity.

HFSP funding to investigate cellular growth and stresses in plants - Read More…

Research shows first land plants were parasitised by microbes

Research shows first land plants were parasitised by microbes

Sainsbury Laboratory researchers have found that the relationship between plants and filamentous microbes not only dates back millions of years, but that modern plants have maintained this ancient mechanism to accommodate and respond to microbial invaders.

Research shows first land plants were parasitised by microbes - Read More…

Rare mineral discovered in plants for first time

Rare mineral discovered in plants for first time

A rare mineral that holds enticing potential as a new material for industrial and medical applications has been discovered on alpine plants through a collaboration between Sainsbury Laboratory and Cambridge University Botanic Garden.

Rare mineral discovered in plants for first time - Read More…

Plants feel the heat

Plants feel the heat

Sainsbury Laboratory scientists have solved a 79-year-old mystery by discovering how plants vary their response to heat stress depending on the time of day.

Plants feel the heat - Read More…

Fast-talking plants increase flower production within 24-hours of soil nutrient application

Fast-talking plants increase flower production within 24-hours of soil nutrient application

The molecular mechanisms enabling plants to quickly adapt their rate of flower production in response to changing nutrient levels in soil have been revealed by researchers at the Sainsbury Laboratory at the University of Cambridge.

Fast-talking plants increase flower production within 24-hours of soil nutrient application - Read More…

 

 

Supported by the Gatsby Charitable Foundation

Tweet of the Week

 

Katharina Schiessl has been inundated with likes and congratulations for her research published in Current Biology this week. This is a game-changer for researchers aiming to engineer N-fixing into cereals – and her macro photos of nodules and a lateral root are stunning! Follow Kath @kathschiessl on Twitter.

RSS Feed Latest news

Harnessing tomato jumping genes could help speed-breed drought-resistant crops

Sep 16, 2019

Once dismissed as ‘junk DNA’ that served no purpose, a family of ‘jumping genes’ found in tomatoes has the potential to accelerate crop breeding for traits such as improved drought resistance.

Food of the Future: free online course launched to inspire the next generation of scientists

Aug 30, 2019

A new, free online course aimed at 16-19 year olds across Europe, funded by EIT Food and developed by the Gatsby Plant Science Education Programme (GPSEP) at the University of Cambridge alongside international partners, aims to inspire young people to study science so they can help to create food of the future.

How plants coordinate their biological clocks

Aug 15, 2019

New research from James Locke's group shows that clocks in plant seedlings can self-organise without a master.

View all news