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Sutton Trust Summer Schools

last modified Aug 02, 2013 02:00 PM

The Lab collaborated with the Department of Plant Sciences, Science and Plants for Schools and the Botanic Garden in delivering a morning of activities for pupils attending the Sutton Trust Summer Schools. The pupils had in common the likelihood of being the first people in their families to attend any university and a strong interest in biological sciences This was their first day on the summer school, their first set of academic activities together and their first visit to a research lab! They rose to the challenges presented to them with enthusiasm and focus, listening to an undergraduate level lecture on plant poisons and working through a practical involving caffeinating waterfleas. Sainsbury Lab researchers chatted with the pupils over tea and biscuits, hopefully demystifying what research scientists do for a living! The pupils (and the waterfleas!) were animated by the morning's activities, and it is hoped the pupils will be inspired to pursue biological sciences in general, and plant sciences in particular, at undergraduate level.

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