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SLCU to host EMBO Interdisciplinary Plant Science Conference in September 2014

last modified Feb 12, 2014 05:06 PM
Registration is now open for the EMBO Interdisciplinary Plant Science Conference taking place on 21-24 September, 2014

Plant biology is undergoing a major shift in emphasis from the identification and analysis of component parts toward studies of dynamic systems behaviours, with the goal of understanding the relationship between levels of biological organization. This integrative approach is heavily interdisciplinary, involving computational modelling, analysis of the physical properties of tissues, and exploitation of wide species comparisons. Developmental Biology is at the vanguard of this revolution because of its inherently multiscale focus. This EMBO Conference will focus on recent progress in achieving an integrated understanding of plant development.

Places are limited and participants will be selected based on a range of diversity criteria.

Registration and abstract submission deadline: June 30 2014
 
Further information is available here.

 

 

Supported by the Gatsby Foundation

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