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Pop up Plant Science and Feeding the World without Costing the Earth

last modified Apr 21, 2015 11:41 AM
SLCU to offer a range of activities as part of the Festival of Plants on Saturday 16 May
Pop up Plant Science and Feeding the World without Costing the Earth

Festival of Plants, 2014

SLCU is participating in a range of activities as part of the Cambridge University Botanic Garden’s Festival of Plants.

Researchers will be running a series of interactive exhibits in the Pop up Science tent, including magnetic games, computer modelling exercises and a ‘build your own plant’ activity.  Devin O’Connor and Firas Bou Daher will be giving short informal talks in the Talking Plants tent, and several other researchers are planning informal tours of the Garden, exploring various areas of interest.

In association with the Festival of Plants, SLCU will host a lecture by Professor Andrew Balmford (Department of Zoology), Feeding the World without Costing the Earth. The talk will explore various approaches in sustainable agriculture and will take place in the Sainsbury Laboratory Auditorium at 14.00. The lecture is free but ticketed- tickets are available here

A full programme for the Festival of Plants can be found here. Please note that normal Garden admissions charges apply.

 

 

Supported by the Gatsby Foundation

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