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The Future of Sustainable Agriculture: Land Sharing or Land Sparing?

last modified Apr 10, 2015 10:53 AM
SLCU will host a panel discussion on evidence-based approaches to sustainability in agriculture.

As part of the Festival of Plants, SLCU will host a panel discussion on evidence based approaches to agriculture. Given powerful arguments to conserve biodiversity but also increase food production, should we farm intensively on some land sparing the rest for wildlife, or should we farm less intensively on a larger land area with agriculture and wild life sharing the same land?

To discuss these issues, we are hosting a panel discussion. The three panel members have all contributed to this topic from a range of approaches.

The panel-style discussion by moderated by Professor Ottoline Leyser, Director of the Sainsbury Laboratory. It will be followed by a Q &A session and a wine reception.

Attendance is free but ticketed. Tickets are available from
http://sharing-sparing.eventbrite.co.uk

This event is part of Cambridge University Botanic Garden's Festival of Plants.

 

 

Supported by the Gatsby Foundation

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