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Microscopy

Microscopy at the Sainsbury Laboratory covers a wide range of techniques from macro-imaging/photography through to stereofluorescence, confocal, raman and scanning electron microscopy. Support facilities include a well-equipped prep room, sample incubation growth chamber, uninterrupted back-up power supply (for high-end confocal and SEM systems) and data storage on a central server. An advanced workstation contains various tools for 4D analysis including Imaris (4D rendering and tracking), Huygens (deconvolution and 3D rendering) and offline versions of the software used to run the facility microscopes.

SLCU has the following microscopy equipment:

- Light Microscopy
Confocal microscopy
Scanning Electron Microscopy
Atomic Force Microscopy

 

Access to the Microscopy Core Facility

In addition to members of the SLCU, the core facility also supports research carried out in other departments including Plant Sciences, Biochemistry, Neuroscience, Materials Science and Geology. Access to use the facility can be arranged by contacting

 

 

Supported by the Gatsby Charitable Foundation

Tweet of the Week

 

Katharina Schiessl has been inundated with likes and congratulations for her research published in Current Biology this week. This is a game-changer for researchers aiming to engineer N-fixing into cereals – and her macro photos of nodules and a lateral root are stunning! Follow Kath @kathschiessl on Twitter.

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