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Sainsbury Laboratory

 

Peas n Chips: Creating food security with African Yam Bean

8 April 2021

Can one plant produce both tasty and nutritious beans and tubers? Yes, the African yam bean can. Not only does it grow high-protein edible grains and tubers, this drought-resilient crop also replenishes the soil and is highly adaptable to varying-climates.

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How plant stem cells renew themselves – a cytokinin story

8 April 2021

The mechanism by which the plant hormone cytokinin controls cell division has been discovered – a breakthrough that significantly improves our understanding of how plants grow.

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Integrating maths and plant science to explain how plant roots generate a hormone gradient

15 February 2021

The research team that developed a biosensor that first recorded that a distinct gradient of the plant growth hormone gibberellin correlated with plant cell size has now revealed how this distribution pattern is created in roots.

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New research team joins SLCU

13 November 2020

Chris Whitewoods will join the SLCU research leadership team to head a new research group focused on understanding how plants pattern themselves in three dimensions.

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SLCU joins EU partners in 11 million euro cell division project

5 November 2020

SLCU's François Nédélec has joined Andrea Musacchio , from the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology in Dortmund, and Thomas Surrey , from the Centre for Genomic Regulation in Barcelona, to study one of the most fundamental processes in life – cell division. Their project has been awarded a prestigious ERC Synergy...

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New insights could help plants fortify walls against root pathogens

3 September 2020

Sainsbury Laboratory Cambridge University (SLCU) researchers, as part of a multidisciplinary international team, have uncovered a mechanism controlling subtle changes to the architecture of cell walls in plant roots that bolsters their defence against Phytophthora palmivora without negatively affecting plant growth.

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Giles Oldroyd elected as member of EMBO

10 July 2020

Professor Giles Oldroyd is among 63 other scientists from around the world elected this year as Members and Associate Members of the European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO).

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Cells in tight spaces – how the cytoskeleton responds to different cell geometries

9 July 2020

Inside every living cell, there is a network of protein filaments providing an interior scaffold controlling the cell’s shape called the cytoskeleton. Research from the Sainsbury Laboratory Cambridge University (SLCU) suggests that this relationship might actually be two-way, with cell geometry itself having the capacity to influence the organisation of the cytoskeleton in living plant cells.

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Professor Dame Ottoline Leyser appointed as new CEO of UKRI

13 May 2020

Professor Dame Ottoline Leyser DBE FRS, Director of the Sainsbury Laboratory at the University of Cambridge, has been appointed the new Chief Executive Officer of UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), the national funding agency investing in science and research in the UK.

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Giles Oldroyd elected as a fellow of the Royal Society

29 April 2020

Professor Giles Oldroyd has been recognised for his outstanding contributions to science in plant-microbe interactions with his election as a fellow of the Royal Society.

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Peas n Chips: Creating food security with African Yam Bean

8 April 2021

Can one plant produce both tasty and nutritious beans and tubers? Yes, the African yam bean can. Not only does it grow high-protein edible grains and tubers, this drought-resilient crop also replenishes the soil and is highly adaptable to varying-climates.

How plant stem cells renew themselves – a cytokinin story

8 April 2021

The mechanism by which the plant hormone cytokinin controls cell division has been discovered – a breakthrough that significantly improves our understanding of how plants grow.

Integrating maths and plant science to explain how plant roots generate a hormone gradient

15 February 2021

The research team that developed a biosensor that first recorded that a distinct gradient of the plant growth hormone gibberellin correlated with plant cell size has now revealed how this distribution pattern is created in roots.