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Assembled by Cairn in the UK, the inverted spinning disk system is centred around a Nikon Eclipse Ti microscope and a Yokogawa disk CSU-X1. It is most suitable for ultra-fast imaging or for specimens where unwanted photobleaching may be a problem. In the Sainsbury Laboratory, it is commonly used for long time-lapse imaging ranging from overnight to several days.

Offers multidimensional acquisition from two cameras (EMCCD from the Yokogawa, High resolution CCD from the Nikon Ti), sample incubation, FRAP and photoactivation. The Nikon Perfect Focus system prevents specimen z-drift.

Software:

Metamorph

Lasers:

405nm, 445nm, 488nm, 561nm, 514nm

Cameras:

Photometrics Evolve (512x512 EMCCD) and Coolsnap HQ.

Extras:

FRAP module, fully enclosed incubation, sensitive xyz stage movements, Nikon Perfect Focus

Objectives:

Nikon objectives include standard and long working distance lenses for dry, immersion and water dipping. Please contact the for further details.

None

spinningdisk

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