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The Leica SP8 upright confocal is fully automated and particularly suitable for fast image acquisition. It contains both the tandem and resonant scanner for routine and high speed imaging, respectively. Three out of the four detectors are the high sensitivity HyD detectors suitable for low-light imaging.

Software:

Leica AF with Matrixscanner module and FRAP tools

Lasers:

405nm, 442nm, 458nm, 476nm, 488nm, 496nm, 514nm, 561nm, 633nm

Detectors:

3x HyD

1x PMT

T-PMT

Extras:

Piezo z-drive, fully enclosed incubator

A core set of Leica objectives are available:

Dry:

5x, 10x, 20x

Immersion:

63x 1.2NA water

63x 1.4NA oil

100x 1.44NA oil

20x 0.75NA multi-immersion for long working distance/bleaching.

Water dipping:

25x 0.95NA

40x 0.8NA

SP8-Vertical Imager mode.

Within 30 minutes the SP8 can be converted to the Vertical Imager, enabling seedlings to be imaged directly on specific petri dishes as they grow and respond normally to gravity. This involves the microscope nosepiece illuminating to the side. A high performance piezo focusing kit enables rapid z-stacks to be taken and Live Data Software Mode enables multiple regions to be visited.

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