skip to content
 

Confocal microscopy equipment at SLCU comprises five point scanning confocals:

  • Zeiss LSM880 upright equipped with spectral detector and Airyscan module. This microscope is particularly good for imaging problematic fluorophore combinations and achieving better resolution than conventional confocal microscopes.

  • Leica TCS SP8 upright confocal equipped with sensitive HyD detectors. This confocal has a vertical imaging mode, enabling roots grown vertically on petri dishes to be easily imaged as part of a time-lapse experiment.
  • Zeiss LSM700 upright. This microscope is particularly good for imaging the new generation of red fluorescent proteins e.g mCherry and mOrange.
  • Leica-Renishaw SP8-FLIMan. A new type of confocal enabling label-free organelle imaging and Raman detection of molecules. In summary this system enables SLCU to image, in living tissue, the ‘Chemistry of Cells’.
  • Leica SP8-iPhox inverted confocal equipped with cooled ultra-sensitive detectors and all-solid-state lasers. This confocal has been designed for high-end applications, including automated time-lapse imaging over long periods, single photon detection, rapid scanning and detailed quantification.

And a spinning disk microscope:

  • A feature packed inverted spinning disk setup centred around a Nikon Ti Eclipse assembled by Cairn Research. This microscope is particularly good for high sensitivity timelapse imaging.

Latest news

Mechanical buckling of petals produces iridescent patterns visible to bees

14 September 2021

Flowers are employing a materials science phenomenon typically associated with failures in structural engineering to produce exquisite three-dimensional petal patterns to lure pollinators.

Renske Vroomans to lead plant evo-devo research at SLCU

10 September 2021

Dr Renske Vroomans has been appointed to the Sainsbury Laboratory Cambridge University (SLCU) to lead research into the evolutionary dynamics of developmental processes in plants.

Blushing plants reveal when fungi are growing in their roots

23 July 2021

Scientists have created plants whose cells and tissues ‘blush’ with beetroot pigments when they are colonised by fungi that help them take up nutrients from the soil.