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Confocal microscopy

Confocal microscopy equipment at SLCU comprises three point scanning confocals:

  • Zeiss LSM780 upright equipped with spectral detector and ablation laser. This microscope is particularly good for imaging problematic fluorophore combinations and for tile scanning.
  • Leica TCS SP8 upright confocal equipped with sensitive HyD detectors. This confocal has a vertical imaging mode, enabling roots grown vertically on petri dishes to be easily imaged as part of a time-lapse experiment.
  • Zeiss LSM700 upright. This microscope is particularly good for imaging the new generation of red fluorescent proteins e.g mCherry and mOrange.
  • Leica-Renishaw SP8-FLIMan. A new type of confocal enabling label-free organelle imaging and Raman detection of molecules. In summary this system enables SLCU to image, in living tissue, the ‘Chemistry of Cells’.

  • Leica SP8-iPhox inverted confocal equipped with cooled ultra-sensitive detectors and all-solid-state lasers. This confocal has been designed for high-end applications, including automated time-lapse imaging over long periods, single photon detection, rapid scanning and detailed quantification.

And a spinning disk microscope:

  • A feature packed inverted spinning disk setup centred around a Nikon Ti Eclipse assembled by Cairn Research. This microscope is particularly good for high sensitivity timelapse imaging.

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HFSP funding to investigate cellular growth and stresses in plants

Apr 11, 2018

SLCU's Professor Henrik Jönsson is part of an international collaboration that has received funding from the Human Frontier Science Program (HFSP) to develop the first integrated model in plants investigating the effects from cellular growth and stresses on nuclear shape and genetic activity.

Research shows first land plants were parasitised by microbes

Apr 03, 2018

Sainsbury Laboratory researchers have found that the relationship between plants and filamentous microbes not only dates back millions of years, but that modern plants have maintained this ancient mechanism to accommodate and respond to microbial invaders.

Rare mineral discovered in plants for first time

Mar 05, 2018

A rare mineral that holds enticing potential as a new material for industrial and medical applications has been discovered on alpine plants through a collaboration between Sainsbury Laboratory and Cambridge University Botanic Garden.

Plants feel the heat

Feb 13, 2018

Sainsbury Laboratory scientists have solved a 79-year-old mystery by discovering how plants vary their response to heat stress depending on the time of day.

Fast-talking plants increase flower production within 24-hours of soil nutrient application

Jan 24, 2018

The molecular mechanisms enabling plants to quickly adapt their rate of flower production in response to changing nutrient levels in soil have been revealed by researchers at the Sainsbury Laboratory at the University of Cambridge.

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