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Confocal microscopy

Confocal microscopy equipment at SLCU comprises five point scanning confocals:

  • Zeiss LSM880 upright equipped with spectral detector and Airyscan module. This microscope is particularly good for imaging problematic fluorophore combinations and achieving better resolution than conventional confocal microscopes.

  • Leica TCS SP8 upright confocal equipped with sensitive HyD detectors. This confocal has a vertical imaging mode, enabling roots grown vertically on petri dishes to be easily imaged as part of a time-lapse experiment.
  • Zeiss LSM700 upright. This microscope is particularly good for imaging the new generation of red fluorescent proteins e.g mCherry and mOrange.
  • Leica-Renishaw SP8-FLIMan. A new type of confocal enabling label-free organelle imaging and Raman detection of molecules. In summary this system enables SLCU to image, in living tissue, the ‘Chemistry of Cells’.

  • Leica SP8-iPhox inverted confocal equipped with cooled ultra-sensitive detectors and all-solid-state lasers. This confocal has been designed for high-end applications, including automated time-lapse imaging over long periods, single photon detection, rapid scanning and detailed quantification.

And a spinning disk microscope:

  • A feature packed inverted spinning disk setup centred around a Nikon Ti Eclipse assembled by Cairn Research. This microscope is particularly good for high sensitivity timelapse imaging.

Coronavirus

 

SLCU Reopening Site

(for staff & students)

 

University of Cambridge Guidance 

 

We would like to thank NHS staff, key workers and volunteers who are working tirelessly throughout the ongoing coronavirus pandemic in the UK. Our thoughts are with those whose health is impacted here in the UK and around the world.

 

 

Supported by the Gatsby Charitable Foundation

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New insights could help plants fortify walls against root pathogens

Sep 03, 2020

Sainsbury Laboratory Cambridge University (SLCU) researchers, as part of a multidisciplinary international team, have uncovered a mechanism controlling subtle changes to the architecture of cell walls in plant roots that bolsters their defence against Phytophthora palmivora without negatively affecting plant growth.

Giles Oldroyd elected as member of EMBO

Jul 10, 2020

Professor Giles Oldroyd is among 63 other scientists from around the world elected this year as Members and Associate Members of the European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO).

Cells in tight spaces – how the cytoskeleton responds to different cell geometries

Jul 09, 2020

Inside every living cell, there is a network of protein filaments providing an interior scaffold controlling the cell’s shape called the cytoskeleton. Research from the Sainsbury Laboratory Cambridge University (SLCU) suggests that this relationship might actually be two-way, with cell geometry itself having the capacity to influence the organisation of the cytoskeleton in living plant cells.

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